Bottoms Up! - A Peek Inside The New G4 iMac

Thursday, April 11, 2002

by David Engstrom

This is the last in our series of pictures of the new G4 iMac. It is doubtful that most iMac owners will look at the bottom of their iMac more than a handful of times during the life cycle of their machines. Apple doesn't care. Apple has brought the same attention to design detail to the bottom of the iMac, as they have brought to the rest of the machine. The bottom faceplate is made of brushed stainless steel. It is connected by four screws. The screw heads of the screws are very small and will not accommodate a standard Phillips screwdriver. You will need to get a jeweler's type screwdriver to undo them. Once they are loosened all the way, they remain connected to the face plate. So there is no way to lose one of them .... unless of course you misplace the faceplate itself.

Once the faceplate is removed one of the RAM slots and the slot for the Airport card are revealed. There are actually two RAM slots on the G4 iMac. To get to the other one, more disassembly of the iMac is required. This slot will be filled with the RAM that Apple installed originally into the machine. The G4 iMac can take up to 1 GB of Memory.

Over the coming weeks we hope to bring you a series of reports on the new iMac. Links to them will be posted on the Performance Edge index.


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Even the bottom of the iMac is a study in industrial design. Who else but Apple would think of putting their logo on the bottom of the machine ... where it is unlikely to be seen more than a handful of times during the machine's life span.

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The bottom face plate is made of brushed Stainless Steel. Again you can see the air intake holes ringing the bottom of the iMac. These holes take in air, which is then vented out the holes on the top of the base unit.

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The bottom face plate is connected by four screws to the body of the iMac. These screws are very small. You will need something like a jeweler's screwdriver to loosen them

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Getting ready for a RAM upgrade

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Once the faceplate is removed one of the RAM slots is revealed, as is the slot for the Airport card

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A close-up on the RAM and Airport slots -RAM installed

Here the RAM has been removed. In between the RAM slot (right) and the Airport slot (left) you can see the Airport antenna lead. Etched into the body of base unit is an outline that shows you where to plug the antenna in

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